2016's What fiction or non-fiction book are you reading?

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#1
I am starting Lonesome Dove, The Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Larry McMurtry. The miniseries is in my top 10 best movies of all time so I figured it was time to read the book. My wife doesn't even like westerns and almost never cries(i can count on one hand how many times she's cried) and the miniseries made her cry.
 

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#2
I'm currently reading Nicola Griffith's historical novel Hild, which is a fictional account of Saint Hilda of Whitby in eighth century mediaeval Britain. Also listening to Prof. Frances B. Titchener's series of lectures on Rome titled simply A History of Ancient Rome.
 

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#3
I finished Lonesome Dove and it is the only book to date that I would rate a 10/10. I give a lot of five stars but they are usually books that I round up on but this is my first perfect 10/10. I literally laughed out loud and cried even though I knew what was coming. The book is very similar to the miniseries And that speaks great about both of them.
 

kenubrion

Journeyed there and back again
#4
I started David Gemmell's Troy: Lord of the Silver Bow. I think this qualifies as historical fiction as many of the characters are based on real people like Agamemnon, Priam, Hektor and Brad Pitt.
 
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Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#5
Finished off Griffith's Hild and Austen's Emma. Am almost done with Northanger Abbey, too. Very slowly re-reading Bulfinch's Mythology.
 

fbones24

Journeyed there and back again
#6
Listening to "Sapiens" by Yuval Harari. Blowing my mind.
 

Sparrow

Journeyed there and back again
#7
Listening to "Sapiens" by Yuval Harari. Blowing my mind.
OH MY FUCKING GOD!.. somebody around here reading what I'm reading at the moment!

Yes, Sapiens is turning out to be a bunch more interesting than I thought it was going to be. I purchased the audiobook on sale, so you know, wasn't really expecting that much, but I'm thoroughly enjoying the scope of the material. I'm love finding out about some of the theories of what made us sapiens special, and rise above our competitors. Little things in our past that ended up making huge leaps in our ability to survive. The book is like Darwinian Evolution, but with a poetic sense... we sapiens are irrational, silly, believe in nonsense and commit vast resources to that nonsense... but against the longest odds imaginable, here we are. My only complaint thus far, is that I wish the book would have spent more time on our very distant ancestors. It went too quickly from 70,000 years past, and our hunter gatherer days, to the beginnings of civilization.
 

khrm

Listens to The Unbeliever whine about life
#8
Currently reading Capital in the 21st Century. Amazing book. Everyone should read. Author has detached himself from the politics.
 

dunebuggy

Knows the real name of Lower Corte
#9
Having a mini love affair with J.G Ballard's work(admittedly it was through Ian Curtis and joy division's music). Busy with Cocaine nights,surreal,out of time but strangely relevant with all the EU,Brexit turmoil. British expats in a tiny spanish coastal resort,using crime as a stimulant and kafkaesque night theatre,filming porn and burning houses.

Sent from my GT-S5301 using Tapatalk
 

Tanniel

Journeyed there and back again
#10
Just finished Cathedral of the Sea, a historical novel with the building of the Santa Maria del Mar in Barcelona as its backdrop. Since I'm actually there, it seemed fitting to read that book (and it adds something when you can go down and see the actual church that you're reading about). The writing style was somewhat mediocre, but the historical details and subject matter worked in its favour.
 

Diziet Sma

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#11
Just finished Cathedral of the Sea, a historical novel with the building of the Santa Maria del Mar in Barcelona as its backdrop. Since I'm actually there, it seemed fitting to read that book (and it adds something when you can go down and see the actual church that you're reading about). The writing style was somewhat mediocre, but the historical details and subject matter worked in its favour.
I have also read it a while ago. I found it disappointing but for me the worse part was the historical inaccuracies...:meh:
 

Diziet Sma

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#13
Which in particular were you bothered by?
Well, it has been about ten years since I read the book, but if my memory serves me right, Ildefonso portrayed in the novel Pedro IV instead of Pedro III. The references to the conquests of Sardinia and Majorca were also inaccurate. The author also ignored and mishandled the relationship between the County of Barcelona with the Kingdom of Aragon. Besides, as you mentioned, his narrative was clumsy. Let’s say, I haven’t rushed to get his following books…
I don’t mind a historical novel author adapting a bit some historical facts, in order to make it fit with their storyline. Just make sure you add a note clarifying this to the reader.
A good example of this would be Bernard Cornwell. He does this type of “adjusting” every now and then, but then he adds the required notes to avoid misleading the reader.
 

Diziet Sma

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#14
I need a little break from SF; I have just started They Were Counted by Miklós Bánffy, the first book in the Transylvanian Trilogy: a depiction of pre WWI in Hungary. The reviews are truly good. I shall see...
 
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Tanniel

Journeyed there and back again
#15
Going for my second Barcelona novel, Homage to Catalonia; another great Orwell piece. It's a quick and easy read, but I'm trying to take it slow, so I don't finish it at once. Only allowed to read it when sitting on the terrace in the sun.
 

Tanniel

Journeyed there and back again
#17
Done with Orwell, I've moved to the remaining, unread book from my birthday presents in January. The book is called S. and is by Doug Dorst in collaboration with J.J. Abrams (yes, that fellow).

The actual book has more than one layer, though. The physical book (inside the slipcase) is called Ship of Theseus and is presented as a novel by a fictional author, Straka. In the margens of this book are written notes by two literature students, discussing the true identity of the author and the novel - the book is presented as translated by the fictional translator, Caldeira.

Reading this book means you're reading it on many levels. There is the actual novel, Ship of Theseus. In addition to that, you're reading the footnotes by Caldeira, commenting on the text. There are the original comments by E, one of the students, raising questions. Then there is the exchange of comments between E and J, the second student, discussing the book. Finally, there is a second layer of exchange of comments between them, written in the book at a later time (so they have two discussions of the book, but due to the layout, you read comments from both discussions on the same page).

Confused? So am I! I can only read a handful of pages at a time before I need a break. It doesn't stop here, either. The book is full of various objects to aid the immersion. Newspaper clippings, letters, this odd paper wheel that reveals letters based on what longitude and latitude you turn it into... it's mind boggling, but if you are a bibliophile, it's very interesting.
 

Diziet Sma

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#18
Done with Orwell, I've moved to the remaining, unread book from my birthday presents in January. The book is called S. and is by Doug Dorst in collaboration with J.J. Abrams (yes, that fellow).

The actual book has more than one layer, though. The physical book (inside the slipcase) is called Ship of Theseus and is presented as a novel by a fictional author, Straka. In the margens of this book are written notes by two literature students, discussing the true identity of the author and the novel - the book is presented as translated by the fictional translator, Caldeira.

Reading this book means you're reading it on many levels. There is the actual novel, Ship of Theseus. In addition to that, you're reading the footnotes by Caldeira, commenting on the text. There are the original comments by E, one of the students, raising questions. Then there is the exchange of comments between E and J, the second student, discussing the book. Finally, there is a second layer of exchange of comments between them, written in the book at a later time (so they have two discussions of the book, but due to the layout, you read comments from both discussions on the same page).

Confused? So am I! I can only read a handful of pages at a time before I need a break. It doesn't stop here, either. The book is full of various objects to aid the immersion. Newspaper clippings, letters, this odd paper wheel that reveals letters based on what longitude and latitude you turn it into... it's mind boggling, but if you are a bibliophile, it's very interesting.
Did you finish this multiple-personality disorder trigger book? If so, are you ok?All of you...?
 

Tanniel

Journeyed there and back again
#19
Did you finish this multiple-personality disorder trigger book? If so, are you ok?All of you...?
I am only about 25% done. Problem is, I am reading non-fiction on the side, already finished one book and started on another while reading this one. It's not often I experience this, but reading this fictive book is more taxing than reading non-fiction (critical theory).
 

Diziet Sma

Hired Nicomo Cosca, famed soldier of fortune
#20
I am only about 25% done. Problem is, I am reading non-fiction on the side, already finished one book and started on another while reading this one. It's not often I experience this, but reading this fictive book is more taxing than reading non-fiction (critical theory).
I never knew critical theory could be so exciting :) Courage for the 75% left of S!