Do you prefer physical or digital books?

Do you prefer Ebooks or physical books?

  • Ebook

    Votes: 17 44.7%
  • Physical

    Votes: 21 55.3%

  • Total voters
    38

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#62
Oh, you mean with the Swallow birds! Duh. I was thinking of the coke bottle falling on the head of the Bushman. Because of that talk of wind drag.
 

Boreas

Journeyed there and back again
Staff member
#63
Well, it seems I found it funny even whilst thinking of a different film.

EDIT:

OK, so not falling on his head, but close enough. Observe the socio-political effects that result from the appearance of a coke bottle:

 
Last edited:

TomTB

Super Moderator
Staff member
#64
Recently, I've changed somewhat on this topic. Since my daughter was born, I've found that I'm finding it difficult to find the time to read paperbacks. The time that I read the most is just before I go to sleep. With our daughter sleeping in the same room, I pretty much have to turn all the lights off, which means I can't read traditional books, I'm pretty much limited to reading on my kindle (or kindle app on phone). This is reflected in the fact that I've read 3 books on my kindle so far this year (Skin Game, Stardust, Hounded), and just part of 1 on paperback (175 pages into Stone of Farewell)
 

Anti_Quated

Journeyed there and back again
#68
I have enough screen time to bear and suffer under in my day job and amidst the technological trauma this engenders it is a remarkable reprieve to have the nourishing solace of a physical book. The tactile experience of some treasured, precious tome is borderline fetish, yet I will not be swayed by those extolling the virtues of the E-Reader. My eyes can take no more!
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#69
My eyes can take no more!
Actually, e-ink readers like kindles or kobos affect your eyes no more than a paper book would. I would wager they cause it even less because I can enlarge the font on my kindle which I can't do with a paper book.
But if you are talking about tablets like android ones or ipad, than there can be some eye strain for sure. But I don't count an ipad as an ereader in the first place, so to each his own.
 

Anti_Quated

Journeyed there and back again
#70
No, no, it's all too hard!

I'm conceited enough to venture down the tangled path of myopia and tell myself it's acceptable because it's an anachronistic tic, and it makes me more eccentric.
I have heard the E-Ink isn't the blight I've taken other e-formats to be, but my reticence remains in spite of the evidence. I appreciate the convenience and ease of access, but I don't know, there's some insane little doomsday-prepper buried in the chasm of my sub-conscious that keeps chanting maniacally 'When the power goes out for good, you can still read by the light of a candle!!'. This same inexplicable condition relates to my need to hoard CDs. That and the vulgarity that is the 'Australia' tax.

Pity me. Hahahaha.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#71
Well as a person who has both myopia and astigmatism, I can say that my experience during the 3 years I used e-ink kindles has been nothing but positive. Also I lived through one 4 year doomsday event in my life, with the longest siege in history of modern warfare, and trust me there are bigger fish to fry then worrying about your reading material.
 

Anti_Quated

Journeyed there and back again
#72
Also I lived through one 4 year doomsday event in my life, with the longest siege in history of modern warfare, and trust me there are bigger fish to fry then worrying about your reading material.
Forgive the cheeky tone, I don't mean to trivialise at all (and due apologies for any offence), but in a light-hearted idiom... 4 year siege? Isn't that exactly the time to worry about a good supply of reading material?
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#73
Forgive the cheeky tone, I don't mean to trivialise at all (and due apologies for any offence), but in a light-hearted idiom... 4 year siege? Isn't that exactly the time to worry about a good supply of reading material?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Sarajevo

I know most people who haven't lived through it don't really understand this but no it's not. When 14000 of your people have been killed during those 4 years, and when every day you resign with the fact that you're a basically a dead man living on borrowed time, when a siege can break any minute and everything can turn to slaughter, rape and pillage, than no it's not the time to worry about your reading material.

Now not to turn this topic any more darker here's a bunny tax.
 

Anti_Quated

Journeyed there and back again
#74
Consider me duly remonstrated. Apologies, again.

With regard to the original topic, I can't help but wonder what future generations might think to unearth a Kindle, as opposed to hardback. What secrets lay within?
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#75
Seriously no need to apologize. You were just curious in my mind and I always respect curiosity.
With regard to the original topic, I can't help but wonder what future generations might think to unearth a Kindle, as opposed to hardback. What secrets lay within?
Unless humanity suffers some unimaginable catastrophe in the future I don't think there will be such a loss of knowledge that future generations wont know/understand past technologies. Not in a sense of the knowledge we lost in ancient teachings of Greeks and Romans with the rise of Catholicism in Europe and beginning of dark ages.
 

wakarimasen

Journeyed there and back again
#76
Unless humanity suffers some unimaginable catastrophe in the future I don't think there will be such a loss of knowledge that future generations wont know/understand past technologies
I'm sure all civilisations felt the same way. I would have thought, given the above, you would have an acute awareness of the fragility of what we believe to be impervious and eternal.
I read an interesting article once, can't find it though, on the difficulties of marking out ground in which we would bury spent nuclear fuel rods. How do you make a sign that says "Don't dig here or you'll die" to someone alive in 10,000 years?
Back to ereaders though: This site is probably going to be responsible for me getting an e-reader. Not because of recommendations but because I can't get into bed properly now with the pile of books choking my side.
 

Sneaky Burrito

Crazy Cat Lady
Staff member
#77
This site is probably going to be responsible for me getting an e-reader.
Haha, I wouldn't have one if I hadn't won one of the giveaways a few years ago. But if something happens and it quits working, I would buy a replacement.
 

ofer

Journeyed there and back again
#79
How do you make a sign that says "Don't dig here or you'll die" to someone alive in 10,000 years?
You don't. This kind of sign, when found, will make it absolutely sure that future generations will dig there just to see what it's all about. Human nature.
Best thing to do will be to leave no sign whatsoever. Then there is a slight chance that no-one will find it. Otherwise, the sign is pretty much a breadcrumb trail leading to the spring-trap at the end.
 

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#80
I'm sure all civilisations felt the same way. I would have thought, given the above, you would have an acute awareness of the fragility of what we believe to be impervious and eternal.
I don't think we're impervious to destruction. It's just that civilization today is very different to ancient ones. Rather than having isolated spots of progress, most of the world today is civilized. Also I'm thinking that just based on the sheer scale of current civilization of what we have built and the way we copy information today. It would take a lot more to destroy all of that in a manner past civilizations were destroyed. In ancient times books were a rare commodity, you had to transcribe by hand to have a copy. Most of the people were illiterate compared to today. When the great library of Alexandria was destroyed we lost a lot of works we couldn't bring back. But today there are copies of a copy of a copy. Imo, it is not impossible, but it is highly unlikely that we can lose information like that today.