Do you prefer physical or digital books?

Do you prefer Ebooks or physical books?

  • Ebook

    Votes: 17 44.7%
  • Physical

    Votes: 21 55.3%

  • Total voters
    38

Alucard

In the name of the Pizza Lord. Charge!
Staff member
#81
Ereaders are great for reading novels and tablets are great for reading pdf's of books too heavily reliant on very-specific-formatting to look good on ereaders (that is, they're packed with charts, images, etc.). The only exception to that I've found is a few very large books I own, physically one is 12" x 15" for example, but I also have a pdf copy of that one and trying to read that on a tablet is a huge pain - constant zooming in and zooming out, scrolling around, etc., so I'd just as soon pull out the physical book instead. If I didn't get 99% of my books from the library where 99% of the books are physical, I'd have gone totally digital by now, so I guess that puts me in the "prefer digital" camp now.
Tablets are great for comics as well, but I still prefer physical copy with those.
I also have a lot of large art books, cookbooks and encyclopedias around 8x12 inches and above, and I wouldn't want to replace those with digital editions either.
E-ink ereaders were intended for novels, and I always get surprised at how many people want to read PDF files on 6 inch screen. I tried it and it's a horrible reading experience. Especially with PDFs that include pictures, charts or any graphics. Even when they are all text it's horrible. They weren't intended for pdfs at all and you shouldn't use them for that. You wouldn't use a fork to eat soup. But people will be people.
 

Anti_Quated

Journeyed there and back again
#83
You wouldn't use a fork to eat soup.
Do I get a prize for trying?

My daughter has an e-reader, and oddly enough the .pdfs I download for her work fairly well, though there are a few issues with formatting. She reads it even at night on the odd occasion without complaint, but shares my preference for hard copy, which is nice. It may simply be a generational thing (acculturation to new technology) as much as it is an idiosyncratic thing.
 

wakarimasen

Journeyed there and back again
#84
There was an interesting article recently (can't remember where) that showed that the current crop of students in the u.s. preferred hard copies over digital. Being a digital native doesn't preclude you from appreciating the feel of paper it seems. Which is kind of cool I think.
 

chongjasmine

Got in a fistfight with Dresden
#85
I used to prefer physical books, but that changed once I owned a nook hd.
The ability to carry more than 1000 books in my nook turned me to prefer ebooks over physical books.
 

Mohammed Al Mulla

Owns a Ring of Power
#87
Physical books are un-matchable by the ebooks.. they have a taste while reading.. while flipping the pages.. the smell of papers, glue and ink.. seeing the number of pending pages reducing with every flip of a page.. that is what reading is all about.. my brother in law told me of a new thing called "Audio Books" where someone is actually reading the novel which could be an MP3 file..... that is just what novel reading is TOTALLY NOT ABOUT.. this is called humiliation >.<
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#88
Physical books are un-matchable by the ebooks.. they have a taste while reading.. while flipping the pages.. the smell of papers, glue and ink.. seeing the number of pending pages reducing with every flip of a page.. that is what reading is all about.. my brother in law told me of a new thing called "Audio Books" where someone is actually reading the novel which could be an MP3 file..... that is just what novel reading is TOTALLY NOT ABOUT.. this is called humiliation >.<
To each his own. I also prefer physical books over digital ones or audio books, but I can imagine other people feeling differently. If, for example, I'd commute to work by car, I would definitely pick up audiobooks.
 

sopranosfan

Journeyed there and back again
#89
To each his own. I also prefer physical books over digital ones or audio books, but I can imagine other people feeling differently. If, for example, I'd commute to work by car, I would definitely pick up audiobooks.
That's me. I prefer physical but I am an audible member with lots of audio books and I'm not going to pass up a $2 or under digital book I'm interested in. I want the story more than anything else and I don't care how I get my drugs......I mean books.
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#92
Today I read an interesting new item about why physical books are very important. Apparently research was done by someone attached to the University of Amsterdam. She wrote a 200 page book about her conclusions. The article is only available in Dutch, so here it is for my Dutch speaking brethren:

http://www.vn.nl/waarom-we-het-papieren-boek-moeten-koesteren/

@Griffin, @Jakyro

And a link to the book itself (price: 12.95 for a physical copy): http://www.bol.com/nl/p/het-boek-en...er=ADVNLPPcefbd200ad86a59c00241edda8000033673
 

Griffin

Journeyed there and back again
#93
I've read the article but she doesn't argue why the demise of physical books would do the same for eBooks. I'm curious, but not curious enough to read a book about it tbh, rather a short paper or something similar.
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#94
Digital books makes my eyes hurt.
Sorry to hear that, ... but maybe you tried the wrong reader?

I remember that some time after getting my first kindle, when I was pondering to buy Brandon Sanderson's "Mistborn", I checked the Amazon website and found out that a 3-book-box set only cost 1 Eur more than the Kindle version of those 3 books. So, naturally, I thought that I would rather want to own the physical books, if the price difference was only so small, and bought the box set.

However, when the books arrived - paperback books printed in very small print on very dark/gray/uneven paper, and I was reading them during my morning train commute, in December in Germany (not one of the brightest months), I was longingly thinking ... "Why, oh why did I not buy the e-book???? Then I could read it without straining my eyes, in a larger font, on my beautifully lighted kindle..." (at that time the Kindle "Fire", as the "Paperwhite" was not available yet).

The positive effect, however, was, that I could pass on that box set to a friend once I had read it, which is not so easy with electronic books....
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#96
As a matter of fact, 3 of my ebook-readers are with some of my friends, and 5 are with my family :D

Handing over an old Kindle is actually easier than sitting down with Calibre and so on.....
 

Silvion Night

Sir Readalot
Staff member
#97
As a matter of fact, 3 of my ebook-readers are with some of my friends, and 5 are with my family :D

Handing over an old Kindle is actually easier than sitting down with Calibre and so on.....
Really Andy, are you sure you're not a majority shareholder in Amazon Kindles?
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#98
No, but I guess I am one of those contributing significantly to the Amazon shareholders' happiness.....
 

Derk of Derkholm

Journeyed there and back again
#99
One more thing to like about e-readers ... out of print books!

It does not cost Amazon or the publishing houses much to digitize some obscure 50's or 60's Science fiction books if they have a printed version available that they can feed through the OCR scanner and somebody to proofread.

I was very happy, e.g., to finally be able to read Cordwainer Smith's "Quest of the 3 worlds" on my Kindle, after being too lazy to go hunting for the out-of-print books for many years.

That book had been out of print since the 90's, but was re-published in electronic form in 2011. I had read one of the 3 parts of it in an anthology and had been wanting to read the other parts ever since....